Recently diagnosed with HIV? Click here

Reports, Papers, Submissions for 2010

Filter by type

NAPWHA Annual Report 2009 - 2010

Annual report • Adrian Ogier • 11 November 2010

The NAPWHA Annual Report 2009-2010 is now published.

"This annual report provides a taste of what has been a rich, varied and complex period for us all." read more »

Mapping HIV outcomes: geographical and clinical forecasts of numbers of people living with HIV in Australia

Report • Jo Watson • 28 October 2010

At the 2010 ASHMAustralasian Society for HIV Medicine. The peak Australasian organisation representing the medical and health sector in HIV/AIDS and related areas. conference, NAPWHA and the National Centre in HIV EpidemiologyThe branch of medical science that deals with the study of incidence and distribution and control of a disease in a population. and ClinicalPertaining to or founded on observation and treatment of participants, as distinguished from theoretical or basic science. Research jointly launched the report “Mapping HIV outcomes: geographical and clinical forecasts of numbers of people living with HIV in Australia”. read more »

Submission to Inquiry into the Migration Treatment of Disability

Submission • Peter Canavan • 12 March 2010

The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, and the Parliamentary Secretary for Disabilities and Children's Services, have asked the Joint Standing Committee on Migration to undertake an inquiry relating to the health requirement in the Migration Act. NAPWHA has made a Submission to this enquiry. read more »

Clinical Trial Action Group Public Submissions

Submission • Scott Lockhart • 12 March 2010

NAPWHA recently contributed to the Clinical TrialA clinicalPertaining to or founded on observation and treatment of participants, as distinguished from theoretical or basic science. trial is a research study to answer specific questions about vaccines or new therapies or new ways of using known treatments. Clinical trials are used to determine whether new drugs or treatments are both safe and effective. Carefully conducted clinical trials are the fastest and safest way to find treatments that work in people. Trials are in four phases: Phase IA clinical trial designed to establish whether an experimental drug is safe for humans to take. Phase I studies determine the metabolism and pharmacologic actions of drugs in humans, the side effects associated with increasing doses, and look for early evidence of effectiveness; these studies may include either people with HIV, HIV-negative volunteers, or both tests a new drug or treatment in a small group; Phase IIA smaller clinical trial designed to establish whether a drug is effective. Phase II studies are conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the drug for a particular indication or indications in patients with the disease or condition under study and to determine the common short-term side effects and risks. If there is evidence that the drug is effective, a Phase III study is undertaken, with a larger number of participaants, to confirm this. expands the study to a larger group of people; Phase IIIA large clinical trial designed to establish whether a drug is effective and safe enough for widespread use. Phase III studies include expanded controlled and uncontrolled trials after preliminary evidence suggesting effectiveness of the drug has been obtained, and are intended to gather additional information to evaluate the overall benefit-risk relationship of the drug and provide and adequate basis for physician labeling. expands the study to an even larger group of people; and Phase IVPost-marketing studies to delineate additional information including the drug's risks, benefits, and optimal use. takes place after the drug or treatment has been licensed and marketed. Action Group. NAPWHA has been closely engaged in clinicalPertaining to or founded on observation and treatment of participants, as distinguished from theoretical or basic science. trials involving PLHIVPerson (or people) Living with HIV. This term is now preferred over the older PLWHA. throughout its history. read more »

Text size: font smallerfont normalfont larger